Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer – Online First – Springer

Dyadic growth is a phenomenon not limited to breast cancer or female patient couples and may represent a form of dyadic coping. Patients and partners seem to develop individual and dyadic growth, depending on a combination of gender and life threat. Psycho-oncology services may want to promote both couple level coping and support in order to optimize cancer care.

via Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer – Online First – Springer.

“You need something like this to give you guidelines on what to do”: patients’ and partners’ use and perceptions of a self-directed coping skills training resource – Online First – Springer

Preliminary evaluation of Coping-Together supported its practical approach and highlighted improvements to enhance its contribution to patient and partner coping.

via “You need something like this to give you guidelines on what to do”: patients’ and partners’ use and perceptions of a self-directed coping skills training resource – Online First – Springer.

Burden among partner caregivers of patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer within 1 year after diagnosis: an economic perspective – Online First – Springer

Pilot estimates on non-medical economic burden among partner caregivers (spouses) during the initial phase of the treatment provide important information for comprehensive estimation of disease burden and can be used in cost-effectiveness analyses of prostate cancer interventions.

via Burden among partner caregivers of patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer within 1 year after diagnosis: an economic perspective – Online First – Springer.

“No one said this would be an issue…” Intimacy after ostomy… : Nursing2013

“I’D RATHER DIE than have a colostomy,” he said.“What about me? Would you rather I die than have a colostomy?” I asked.“Of course not,” my husband replied, rather automatically. My feelings were hurt. “I think I’m going to wear an ostomy pouch for a week; just to see what it’s like,” I said. “Would you have sex with me if I had one?”“We’d have to work things out,” he responded, not realizing the impact of his words.

via “No one said this would be an issue…” Intimacy after ostomy… : Nursing2013.

Multidimensional Needs of Caregivers for Patients With Cancer – Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing – Oncology Nursing Society

Caregivers frequently experienced fatigue, anxiety, and insomnia.

via Multidimensional Needs of Caregivers for Patients With Cancer – Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing – Oncology Nursing Society.

Intimate Partner Violence in an Outpatient Palliative Care Setting

Intimate Partner Violence in an Outpatient Palliative Care Setting

via Intimate Partner Violence in an Outpatient Palliative Care Setting.

Providing Informal Care in Terminal Illness

The most valued services are those that support carers in their caregiving role; however, supportive care preferences vary with the different circumstances of patients and carers.

via Providing Informal Care in Terminal Illness.

Losing Spouses – Gianakos – 2013 – Journal of the American Geriatrics Society – Wiley Online Library

Losing Spouses – Gianakos – 2013 – Journal of the American Geriatrics Society – Wiley Online Library.

JAMA Network | JAMA | The Critical Role of Caregivers in Achieving Patient-Centered Care

Achieving high-quality, cost-effective medical care remains an elusive goal of the US health care system, but there is widespread agreement that patient-centered care will be a key ingredient.1 Yet for frail elders and patients with advanced illness, many of whom have multiple chronic diseases, patient-centered care is impossible without caregiver involvement.

via JAMA Network | JAMA | The Critical Role of Caregivers in Achieving Patient-Centered Care.

Cambridge Journals Online – Palliative & Supportive Care – Abstract – Attachment style, social support and finding meaning among spouses of colorectal cancer patients: Gender differences

Significance of results: Psychological interventions for caregivers should take into consideration gender differences and might benefit from addressing the process of finding meaning in caregiving.

via Cambridge Journals Online – Palliative & Supportive Care – Abstract – Attachment style, social support and finding meaning among spouses of colorectal cancer patients: Gender differences.