The Impact of Religiosity and Individual Prayer Activities on Advanced Cancer Patients’ Health: Is There Any Difference in Function of Whether or Not Receiving Palliative Anti-neoplastic Therapy? – Online First – Springer

Higher religion scores were associated with lower levels of inflammation in advanced cancer patients still undergoing ANTs. Additionally, higher IPA was an independent good prognostic factor in patients on active ANTs. Further studies are necessary to confirm these findings and to investigate possible biological mechanisms involved.

via The Impact of Religiosity and Individual Prayer Activities on Advanced Cancer Patients’ Health: Is There Any Difference in Function of Whether or Not Receiving Palliative Anti-neoplastic Therapy? – Online First – Springer.

Life, Interrupted: A Test of Faith – NYTimes.com

With a Catholic mother and a Muslim father, I’ve always had a great interest in religion, but I’ve never practiced one myself. After I received a diagnosis of an aggressive form of leukemia at the age of 22, I put my faith in medicine.

via Life, Interrupted: A Test of Faith – NYTimes.com.

Islam and the four principles of medical ethics — Mustafa — Journal of Medical Ethics

The principles underpinning Islam’s ethical framework applied to routine clinical scenarios remain insufficiently understood by many clinicians, thereby unfortunately permitting the delivery of culturally insensitive healthcare. This paper summarises the foundations of the Islamic ethical theory, elucidating the principles and methodology employed by the Muslim jurist in deriving rulings in the field of medical ethics

via Islam and the four principles of medical ethics — Mustafa — Journal of Medical Ethics.

A Young Adult Jehovah’s Witness With Severe Anemia

Two of the most ethically complex situations in pediatrics are those involving families whose religious beliefs preclude the provision of life-sustaining treatment and those involving young adults who have reached the age of legal majority and who face decisions about life-sustaining treatment.

via A Young Adult Jehovah’s Witness With Severe Anemia.

Medical Futility Blog: Catholic Health Association on POLST

The Catholic Health Association of the United States (CHA) has devoted a major section in its latest issue of Health Care Ethics USA to POLST.

via Medical Futility Blog: Catholic Health Association on POLST.

Association between religious and socio-economic background of parents of children with solid tumors and DNR orders – Hileli – 2013 – Pediatric Blood & Cancer – Wiley Online Library

The process of decision-making to a DNR request was associated with parents’ educational level and monthly family income, and not by religious background, with the exception of Druze families.

via Association between religious and socio-economic background of parents of children with solid tumors and DNR orders – Hileli – 2013 – Pediatric Blood & Cancer – Wiley Online Library.

CHEST Journal | Article

Conclusion:  Besides an altered intestinal permeability in COPD patients at rest, performing ADLs led to enterocyte damage in addition to intestinal hyperpermeability in COPD patients but not in controls, indicating functional alteration in the gastrointestinal tract. Hence, intestinal compromise should be considered as a new component of the multisystem disorder COPD.

via CHEST Journal | Article.

Medical Futility Blog: Defending POLST

A few weeks ago, I charged that the Catholic attack on POLST is “dangerous.”  That drew a response, not from the Catholic attackers, but from Jason Manne, another critic of POLST.

via Medical Futility Blog: Defending POLST.

Why I pray for my patients

Call it  a plea for the health of my patients, I “pray” for two reasons:

via Why I pray for my patients.

Cambridge Journals Online – Palliative & Supportive Care – Abstract – Do spiritual patients want spiritual interventions?: A qualitative exploration of underserved cancer patients’ perspectives on religion and spirituality

Significance of results: Spirituality plays a central role in the cancer experience of this underserved ethnically-diverse population. While spirituality seems to be a universal concern in advanced cancer patients, the meaning of spirituality differs across individuals, with some equating it with organized religion and others taking a more individualized approach. It is important that psychosocial interventions are developed to address this concern. Future research is needed to further explore the different ways that patients conceptualize spirituality and to develop spiritually-based treatments that are not “one size fits all.”

via Cambridge Journals Online – Palliative & Supportive Care – Abstract – Do spiritual patients want spiritual interventions?: A qualitative exploration of underserved cancer patients’ perspectives on religion and spirituality.