The Bereavement Counselor: Public Misperception ~ Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog

We are often asked, How can you do that? How can you stand to do that work? Such a dreary subject. Grim but supposedly necessary. Don’t you get depressed with all the talk of dying?

via The Bereavement Counselor: Public Misperception ~ Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog.

Does the use of the revised Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PATrev) result in improved quality of life and reduced psychosocial risk in Canadian families with a child newly diagnosed with cancer? – Barrera – 2013 – Psycho-Oncology – Wiley Online Library

Does the use of the revised Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PATrev) result in improved quality of life and reduced psychosocial risk in Canadian families with a child newly diagnosed with cancer? – Barrera – 2013 – Psycho-Oncology – Wiley Online Library.

On Death and Fear: A Personal Reflection on the Value of Social Psychology Research to the Practice of Oncologists

On Death and Fear: A Personal Reflection on the Value of Social Psychology Research to the Practice of Oncologists.

Access : |[lsquo]|Being there|[rsquo]| for women with metastatic breast cancer: a pan-European patient survey : British Journal of Cancer

These findings show a continuing need to provide women with advanced breast cancer with better information and emphasise the importance that these patients often place on prolonging survival.

via Access : |[lsquo]|Being there|[rsquo]| for women with metastatic breast cancer: a pan-European patient survey : British Journal of Cancer.

Together and apart: providing psychosocial support for patients and families living with brain tumors – Online First – Springer

Brain tumor support group facilitators can expect to encounter a range of medical and psychosocial issues in accommodating patients’ and caregivers’ diverse concerns. Separate brain tumor patient and caregiver groups may allow participants to explore those concerns without worrying about effects on their friends or family. It remains to be seen whether the groups meet the needs of attendees, and whether those who do not attend the groups have unmet needs.

via Together and apart: providing psychosocial support for patients and families living with brain tumors – Online First – Springer.

Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer – Online First – Springer

Dyadic growth is a phenomenon not limited to breast cancer or female patient couples and may represent a form of dyadic coping. Patients and partners seem to develop individual and dyadic growth, depending on a combination of gender and life threat. Psycho-oncology services may want to promote both couple level coping and support in order to optimize cancer care.

via Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer – Online First – Springer.

Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery Versus Supportive Expressive Group Therapy for Distressed Survivors of Breast Cancer (MINDSET)

Conclusion In the largest trial to date, MBCR was superior for improving a range of psychological outcomes for distressed survivors of breast cancer. Both SET and MBCR also resulted in more normative diurnal cortisol profiles than the control condition. The clinical implications of this finding require further investigation.

via Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery Versus Supportive Expressive Group Therapy for Distressed Survivors of Breast Cancer (MINDSET).

Strategies Used by Teens Growing Up in Families With Huntington Disease

Obtaining information, thinking about or doing something else, and actions on behalf of the parent with HD were rated as highest use and perceived helpfulness. Emotional suppression had high use but low helpfulness. Participants reported using numerous helpful strategies. Social support was often unavailable to help manage teen concerns.

via Strategies Used by Teens Growing Up in Families With Huntington Disease.

The ability of informal primary caregivers to accurately report cancer patients’ difficulties – Libert – 2013 – Psycho-Oncology – Wiley Online Library

Family primary caregivers correctly reported approximately two thirds of physical and psychological patients’ difficulties; however, they had less accurate reports of patients’ social difficulties. Correct report rates increased the probability of false report rates. Healthcare professionals should carefully evaluate the accuracy of a primary informal caregiver’s report in regards to patient experiences. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

via The ability of informal primary caregivers to accurately report cancer patients’ difficulties – Libert – 2013 – Psycho-Oncology – Wiley Online Library.

Deborah A. Boyle – Psychosocial Support Services: Still MIA | TheONC | A Gated Community for Oncology Nurses and Cancer Care Teams

Nearly two decades ago, Coluzzi and colleagues published their survey results of supportive services offered at National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers.1 At that time, 68 percent of responding institutions offered counseling interventions, and 90 percent sponsored support groups and had spiritual care departments.

via Deborah A. Boyle – Psychosocial Support Services: Still MIA | TheONC | A Gated Community for Oncology Nurses and Cancer Care Teams.