Values Conflict at the End of Life – NYTimes.com

In theory, or in a more perfect universe, our family members wouldn’t have a hard time deciding what to do when we were near death. However painful the task, the decisions would be clear: We would have prepared a written document, an advance directive, stating what we wanted doctors to do or not do, and our about-to-be survivors would follow our instructions. Simple.

via Values Conflict at the End of Life – NYTimes.com.

Together and apart: providing psychosocial support for patients and families living with brain tumors – Online First – Springer

Brain tumor support group facilitators can expect to encounter a range of medical and psychosocial issues in accommodating patients’ and caregivers’ diverse concerns. Separate brain tumor patient and caregiver groups may allow participants to explore those concerns without worrying about effects on their friends or family. It remains to be seen whether the groups meet the needs of attendees, and whether those who do not attend the groups have unmet needs.

via Together and apart: providing psychosocial support for patients and families living with brain tumors – Online First – Springer.

Strategies Used by Teens Growing Up in Families With Huntington Disease

Obtaining information, thinking about or doing something else, and actions on behalf of the parent with HD were rated as highest use and perceived helpfulness. Emotional suppression had high use but low helpfulness. Participants reported using numerous helpful strategies. Social support was often unavailable to help manage teen concerns.

via Strategies Used by Teens Growing Up in Families With Huntington Disease.

Experience of palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer through the eyes of next of kin: Impact of an expert center – Offerman – Head & Neck – Wiley Online Library

Experience of palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer through the eyes of next of kin: Impact of an expert center – Offerman – Head & Neck – Wiley Online Library.

Satisfaction With Palliative Care After Stroke

Families of patients receiving palliative care at our institution showed generally high satisfaction with palliation after stroke; specific domains were identified for improvement. Further study in larger populations is required.

via Satisfaction With Palliative Care After Stroke.

Health-related Quality of Life, Fatigue, and Posttraumatic Growth of Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy: A Longitudinal Study – Online First – Springer

The results from this analysis suggest that a significant decrease in HRQoL is evident in the fifth/sixth week of RT treatment. However, recovery of HRQoL occurs as quickly as a few weeks after the end of treatment. Moreover, patients with high ratings of Social/Family Well-being experience more positive psychological changes (PTG) resulting from the cancer experience.

via Health-related Quality of Life, Fatigue, and Posttraumatic Growth of Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy: A Longitudinal Study – Online First – Springer.

Burden among partner caregivers of patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer within 1 year after diagnosis: an economic perspective – Online First – Springer

Pilot estimates on non-medical economic burden among partner caregivers (spouses) during the initial phase of the treatment provide important information for comprehensive estimation of disease burden and can be used in cost-effectiveness analyses of prostate cancer interventions.

via Burden among partner caregivers of patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer within 1 year after diagnosis: an economic perspective – Online First – Springer.

Risk Factors for Developing Prolonged Grief During Bereavement in Family Carers of Cancer Patients in Palliative Care: A Longitudinal Study

Screening family carers on entry to palliative care seems to be the most effective way of identifying who has a higher risk of developing PG. We recommend screening carers six months after the death of their relative to identify most carers with PG.

via Risk Factors for Developing Prolonged Grief During Bereavement in Family Carers of Cancer Patients in Palliative Care: A Longitudinal Study.

“No one said this would be an issue…” Intimacy after ostomy… : Nursing2013

“I’D RATHER DIE than have a colostomy,” he said.“What about me? Would you rather I die than have a colostomy?” I asked.“Of course not,” my husband replied, rather automatically. My feelings were hurt. “I think I’m going to wear an ostomy pouch for a week; just to see what it’s like,” I said. “Would you have sex with me if I had one?”“We’d have to work things out,” he responded, not realizing the impact of his words.

via “No one said this would be an issue…” Intimacy after ostomy… : Nursing2013.

Death happens – plan for it: Key checklist – Money Saving Expert

Death can cause financial tragedies as well as grief. Yet planning for the end isn’t about being morbid. It’s about making crucial financial preparations to lessen the impact when it happens.

via Death happens – plan for it: Key checklist – Money Saving Expert.