Billing for end of life conversations needs to be an honest discussion

Good old Earl Blumenauer.  A bespectacled and bowtied Congressman from Oregon.  He of the “death panel” proposal.  Thank God he’s still here.  Presuming that the crazy talk over the provision in the Affordable Care Act that would have paid doctors to discuss end-of-life issues with patients is over, he has introduced a separate bill with this provision and hopes to get it passed in the next couple of years.

via Billing for end of life conversations needs to be an honest discussion.

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Deciding When to Enter a Palliative Care Unit – NYTimes.com

It’s a tough situation: you have a fatal condition. You require care beyond what family members can provide at home. But with a prognosis of more than six months to live, you are not ready for hospice care.

via Deciding When to Enter a Palliative Care Unit – NYTimes.com.

Improving end-of-life care will require fundamental change in thinking | The Tennessean | tennessean.com

Talking about death — even thinking about death — is uncomfortable for patients and families. Nearly 80 percent of us would prefer to spend our last days at home, but the majority of us will die in the hospital, and only 20 percent of us have expressed our wishes in writing.

via Improving end-of-life care will require fundamental change in thinking | The Tennessean | tennessean.com.

Values Conflict at the End of Life – NYTimes.com

In theory, or in a more perfect universe, our family members wouldn’t have a hard time deciding what to do when we were near death. However painful the task, the decisions would be clear: We would have prepared a written document, an advance directive, stating what we wanted doctors to do or not do, and our about-to-be survivors would follow our instructions. Simple.

via Values Conflict at the End of Life – NYTimes.com.

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Quebec’s end-of-life bill makes palliative care more transparent

via Sign In.

Doctors Should Bill for Life-or-Death Decisions – Bloomberg

As an intern admitting emergency-room patients to a Cincinnati hospital, I saw it happen again and again: Late-stage cancer patients in the midst of medical crises would roll into our ER in need of a ventilator as expected complications mounted.

via Doctors Should Bill for Life-or-Death Decisions – Bloomberg.

Reconnection

Learning how to speak with patients about end-of-life topics is often anxiety provoking for medical trainees. However, it also provides a unique opportunity for personal growth. The surprising reward of having such a conversation is presented in this reflection.

via Reconnection.

Erroneous assumptions about deep palliative sedation and euthanasia — Materstvedt — BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care

In the present journal, I recently wrote an article on several of the differences between deep and continuous palliative sedation (DCPS) and euthanasia.1 In doing so, I also criticised certain views of a paper by Niklas Juth and colleagues.2 They answer back in a just-released article, in which they state that “Materstvedt fail[s] to provide an explanation of why there is a moral difference between DCPS and euthanasia” (italics in original).3

via Erroneous assumptions about deep palliative sedation and euthanasia — Materstvedt — BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.

Medical Futility Blog: Compassion & Choices Minnesota End-of-Life Event

COMPASSION & CHOICES OF MINNESOTA will be hosting an event on Sunday, September 8, 2013, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the First Unitarian Society – Chalice Room, 900 Mount Curve, Minneapolis, MN.  This event is free and open to the public as well as to Compassion & Choices members.

via Medical Futility Blog: Compassion & Choices Minnesota End-of-Life Event.

Spotlight on End-of-Life Research | National Institute of Nursing Research

Spotlight on End-of-Life Research | National Institute of Nursing Research.