Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer – Online First – Springer

Dyadic growth is a phenomenon not limited to breast cancer or female patient couples and may represent a form of dyadic coping. Patients and partners seem to develop individual and dyadic growth, depending on a combination of gender and life threat. Psycho-oncology services may want to promote both couple level coping and support in order to optimize cancer care.

via Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer – Online First – Springer.

Strategies Used by Teens Growing Up in Families With Huntington Disease

Obtaining information, thinking about or doing something else, and actions on behalf of the parent with HD were rated as highest use and perceived helpfulness. Emotional suppression had high use but low helpfulness. Participants reported using numerous helpful strategies. Social support was often unavailable to help manage teen concerns.

via Strategies Used by Teens Growing Up in Families With Huntington Disease.

“You need something like this to give you guidelines on what to do”: patients’ and partners’ use and perceptions of a self-directed coping skills training resource – Online First – Springer

Preliminary evaluation of Coping-Together supported its practical approach and highlighted improvements to enhance its contribution to patient and partner coping.

via “You need something like this to give you guidelines on what to do”: patients’ and partners’ use and perceptions of a self-directed coping skills training resource – Online First – Springer.

Cambridge Journals Online – Palliative & Supportive Care – Abstract – Attachment style, social support and finding meaning among spouses of colorectal cancer patients: Gender differences

Significance of results: Psychological interventions for caregivers should take into consideration gender differences and might benefit from addressing the process of finding meaning in caregiving.

via Cambridge Journals Online – Palliative & Supportive Care – Abstract – Attachment style, social support and finding meaning among spouses of colorectal cancer patients: Gender differences.

I’ve had a good life, what’s left is a bonus: Factor analysis of the Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale in a palliative care population

Conclusion: Adaptation to advanced cancer differs from adaptation to early stage cancer, comprising a general acceptance of the illness and trying to make the most of the time that is left. Individuals with low social support were less likely to evidence appropriate adaptation to their illness.

via I’ve had a good life, what’s left is a bonus: Factor analysis of the Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale in a palliative care population.

A longitudinal study of coping strategies in men receiving radiotherapy and neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation for prostate cancer: a quantitative and qualitative study – McSorley – 2013 – Journal of Advanced Nursing – Wiley Online Library

Men used a variety of ways of coping to help them deal with radiotherapy and neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation for up to 12 months after radiotherapy. Interventions need to be developed to take account of the specific needs of partners of men with prostate cancer and single men who have prostate cancer.

via A longitudinal study of coping strategies in men receiving radiotherapy and neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation for prostate cancer: a quantitative and qualitative study – McSorley – 2013 – Journal of Advanced Nursing – Wiley Online Library.

Coping with an exulcerated breast carcinoma: an interpretative phenomenological study

This study demonstrates how difficult it is to live and cope with a malignant fungating wound. Coping strategies, including going into isolation, or denying any issues, were used. When taking care of patients with MFWs, strategies need to integrate a palliative, holistic, empathic approach.

via Coping with an exulcerated breast carcinoma: an interpretative phenomenological study.

Interview With Sheri Brisson, Co-Author of Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges | Steve Mariotti

Digging Deep is an innovative journal that guides seriously ill children and teenagers through writing exercises that help them explore their feelings about being sick, and develops their coping skills.

via Interview With Sheri Brisson, Co-Author of Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges | Steve Mariotti.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Family Caregivers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

MBSR could reduce stress and improve mental health in caregivers of family members with dementia residing in the community.

via Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Family Caregivers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

‘I know they are distressed. What do I do now?’ [Psychooncology. 2013] – PubMed – NCBI

Significant advances have been made in our understanding of psychological adjustment to cancer over the last 40 years. Most clinicians now recognise the importance of psychosocial factors and the need for skills in emotional support. In the first phase of psycho-oncology, pioneering work in the 1970s and 1980s mapped the extent of psychological morbidity in cancer. This has been followed by a second phase where clinical trials have demonstrated that psychological treatments are effective.

via ‘I know they are distressed. What do I do now?’ [Psychooncology. 2013] – PubMed – NCBI.